Beginning ASL: Week Three

Beginning American Sign Language Class: Week Three

  • Prayer
  • Review
  • Fingerspelling

 

Review

  • Receptive Fingerspelling Quiz
  • Numbers 0-40
  • Time (number incorporation)

 

Review: Pronoun Vocabulary

  • I/Me
  • You
  • He/She/It, Him/Her
  • We/us
  • They/Them
  • You (plural)
  • My/Mine
  • Your/Yours
  • His/Her/Hers/Its
  • Our/Ours
  • Their/Theirs
  • Your/Yours (plural)

 

Dialogue 1 Vocabulary

  • Hello
  • What
  • Name
  • Nice
  • Meet
  • Same, Like
  • Same-As-Me

 

Vocabulary: Relationships

  • Mom
  • Grandma
  • Woman
  • Girl
  • Daughter
  • Granddaughter
  • Sister
  • Wife
  • Girlfriend
  • Aunt
  • Cousin (female)
  • Niece
  • Dad
  • Grandpa
  • Man
  • Boy
  • Son
  • Grandson
  • Brother
  • Husband
  • Boyfriend
  • Uncle
  • Cousin (male)
  • Nephew

 

Vocabulary: Emotions/States Of Being

  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Upset
  • Angry, mad
  • Tired
  • Excited
  • Fine
  • Disappointed, miss
  • Scared, frightened
  • Nervous, anxious
  • Proud
  • Bored
  • Curious
  • Embarrassed
  • Frustrated
  • Worried, troubled
  • Surprised
  • OK
  • Silly
  • Funny
  • Good

 

Vocabulary: Places

  • Work
  • School
  • Home
  • Church
  • Store
  • Restaurant
  • Starbucks
  • Target
  • In-N-Out

 

Vocabulary: Random

  • Go
  • Want
  • Don’t-want
  • Need
  • Delicious
  • Can’t
  • Enjoy
  • Oh-I-See
  • Thank-You
  • Class
  • Two-of-Us
  • Two-of-them

 

Vocabulary: Common Phrases

  • What are you doing?/What do you want to do?
  • What’s up?
  • How are you?

 

Vocabulary: Wh-words

  • Who
  • What
  • Where
  • When
  • Why
  • How
  • How-Many
  • Non-manual marker: The eyebrows are furrowed a bit (squeezed somewhat together) and the head moved slightly forward.

 

Week Two Dialogue

  • Person A:
  • Hello, how are you?
  • HELLO HOW-YOU.
  • Person B:
  • I’m excited. How are you?
  • ME EXCITED ME. HOW-YOU.
  • Person A:
  • I’m fine. Why are you excited?
  • ME FINE ME. YOU EXCITED WHY.
  • Person B:
  • At seven o’clock I’m going to Starbucks.
  • TIME-7 ME WHAT-DO. GO STARBUCKS.
  • Person A:
  • Starbucks is delicious.
  • STARBUCKS DELICIOUS.
  • Person B:
  • Do you want to go to Starbucks?
  • STARBUCKS TWO-OF-US GO WANT.
  • Person A:
  • I have ASL class at six so I can’t.
  • ME CAN’T. WHY. CLASS A-S-L TIME-6.
  • Person B:
  • I understand. Enjoy class.
  • OH-I-SEE. CLASS ENJOY.
  • Person A:
  • Thanks. I will.
  • THANK-YOU. I WILL I. (positive head nod)

 

New material

  • Numbers 41-60
  • Fingerspelling: Expressive (fluid, incompletely formed)
  • Fingerspelling: Receptive (sound it out)
  • Number incorporation:
  • #-OF-US
  • #-OF-THEM
  • Money
  • Cents
  • Dollars

 

Vocabulary: Random for Examples

  • Dollars
  • 100
  •  There/It
  • Movie
  • Finish
  • See
  • Send-you
  • Letter
  • Phone
  • Home
  • Homework
  • Eat
  • Won
  • Cool
  • Sunset
  • Beautiful
  • Stay
  • Will
  • Not-Yet
  • Promise
  • Twice

 

Vocabulary: Time

  • Day
  • Week
  • Weekend
  • Month
  • Year
  • Every-year/annually
  • Everyday
  • Weekly
  • Monthly
  • Jan-Dec
  • Yesterday
  • Two-days-ago
  • Recently
  • Today
  • Tomorrow
  • Past/before
  • Future

 

Vocabulary: Colors

  • Red
  • Orange
  • Yellow
  • Green
  • Blue
  • Purple
  • White
  • Pink
  • Gold
  • Silver
  • Tan
  • Gray
  • Black

 

Vocabulary: Religious

  • God
  • Lord
  • Messiah
  • Praise
  • You/Him (pretty)
  • Bible
  • Baptize/baptism
  • Jesus
  • Christ
  • Salvation/redemption/saved
  • Savior
  • Hallelujah
  • Heaven
  • Hell
  • Sin
  • Rose again/resurrected
  • Books of the Bible
  • Holy
  • Purity
  • Righteousness
  • Justified
  • Cross
  • Death
  • Resurrection

 

New material: Common Sentence Structures-Topic, Comment

  • The following non-manual signals [facial grammar] play a role in identifying the topic in a topic/comment sentence structure. The signer (1) maintains eye contact with the person being addressed, (2) raises the eyebrow and tilts the head slightly forward when signing the topic, (3) holds the last sign of the topic a little longer than the other signs, and (4) pauses slightly between signing the topic and the comment.

 

New material: Common Sentence Structures-Topic, Comment

  • When signing the comment, the signer uses facial expressions that convey the emotion of what is signed.
  • If the comment is SHE UPSET, the signer should project a face associated with being upset.
  • But the face does not always correspond with the emotions projected by the signs.
  • For example, if the signer is being sarcastic, humorous, silly, or serious, then she or he might wish to convey these feelings rather than the feelings associated with the comment itself.
  • If a signer is in fact being funny, then she or he might have a hint of smile on the face while signing SHE UPSET.
  • Similarly, the lips might be pursed and the eyebrows squeezed together while signing a comment, if a signer is serious about something.

 

New material: Common Sentence Structures-Time, Topic, Comment or Tense With Time Adverbs

  • Placing a time adverb at or near the beginning of a sentence marks the tense of the sentence.
  • Using time adverbs is the most common means of indicating tense.
  • Unlike English, verb signs never undergo changes to indicate tense.
  • Because there are no changes to a verb sign, the time that an action occurred must come before the verb sign.

 

New material: Common Sentence Structures-Time, Topic, Comment or Tense With Time Adverbs

  • After a time adverb has indicated tense in a sentence, all sentences after this sentence will have the same tense.
  • There is no need to repeat the time adverb with each sentence.
  • Tense can be changed only by signing a different time adverb, changing the topic of discussion, or using a sign that is not a time adverb but tells about time.

 

New material: Common Sentence Structures-(Time,) Topic, Comment

  • YESTERDAY, HE WON 100 DOLLARS, HE HAPPY.
  • He is happy because yesterday he won one hundred dollars
  • A-S-L CLASS MINE, COOL.
  • My ASL class is cool.
  • BOY THERE, HE AGE-7.
  • That boy is seven years old.
  • LAST NIGHT, SUNSET BEAUTIFUL.
  • The sunset was beautiful last night.
  • ME YESTERDAY, STAY HOME.
  • I stayed home yesterday.

 

New material: Common Sentence Structures-(Time,) Topic, Comment: Varying emphasis

  • 2-YEARS-AGO ME VACATION,WONDERFUL.
  • Two years ago, I had a wonderful vacation.
  • ME WONDERFUL VACATION,2-YEARS-AGO.
  • My last wonderful vacation was 2 years ago.

 

New material: Other Time Signs

  • The signs FINISH, WILL, and NOT-YET are signs that tell about time. The placement of each of these signs in a sentence varies.

 

New material: Time Signs

  • FINISH
  • This sign is often used to indicate that an action has been completed. It is either placed before or after the verb.
  • HE MOVIE FINISH SEE. (before the verb)
  • He saw the movie.
  • ME WORK FINISH. (after the verb)
  • I have finished working.

 

New material: Time Signs

  • WILL
  • This sign is often used in its emphatic sense to stress that an action is indeed going to take place in the future. It can be placed before or after a verb or at the end of a sentence.
  • ME WILL SEND-YOU LETTER. (before the verb)
  • I will send you a letter.
  • MEET-YOU WILL, TOMORROW ME PROMISE. (after)
  • I promise I will meet you tomorrow.
  • PHONE HOME TWICE EVERY-WEEK, ME WILL. (end)
  • I will phone home twice a week.

 

New material: Time Signs

  • NOT-YET
  • This sign is used to show that an action has not yet occurred. It is often placed at the end of a sentence or it can be used by itself in response to a question.
  • At the end of a sentence
  • ME HOMEWORK FINISH, NOT-YET.
  • I haven’t done my homework yet.
  • As a response
  • Person A: YOU EAT FINISH YOU.
  • Have you finished eating?
  • Person B: NOT-YET.
  • Not yet.

 

Vocabulary: Week 3 Dialogue

  • Take-up/adopt
  • Sign
  • Feel
  • More
  • Learn
  • Ready
  • Yes
  • Always
  • Agree

 

Week Three dialogue

  • Person A:
  • YOU TAKE-UP A-S-L WHY?
  • Why are you taking ASL?
  • Person B:
  • ME TAKE-UP A-S-L WHY? ME ENJOY.
  • I am taking ASL because I enjoy it.
  • Person A:
  • SAME-AS-ME. ME SIGN, ME FEEL GOOD.
  • The same with me, I feel good when I sign.
  • Person B:
  • YOU MORE A-S-L LEARN, READY YOU?
  • Are you ready to learn more ASL?
  • Person A:
  • YES, ME READY. YOU?
  • Yes, I’m ready. How about you?
  • Person B:
  • LEARN MORE A-S-L, ME READY ALWAYS.
  • I am always ready to learn more ASL.
  • Person A:
  • ME AGREE.
  • I agree with that.

 

Fingerspelling Review

 

Question: How do you ask for clarification if you didn’t understand or how to sign a word? Part 1

 

Question: How do you ask for clarification if you didn’t understand or how to sign a word? Part 2

 

Receptive Fingerspelling Quiz (and how to sign heart)

 

Note on Signing Space

 

Numbers 0-40 Review and New Numbers 41-60

 

Review of Number Incorporation: Time

 

Vocabulary Review

 

Review of Dialogue 2

 

Notes on Expressive and Receptive Fingerspelling

 

#-OF-US and #-OF-THEM

 

Vocabulary for Example

 

Vocabulary-Time

 

Vocabulary-Colors

 

Vocabulary-Religious

 

Dialogue Three Vocabulary

 

Dialogue Three

6 thoughts on “Beginning ASL: Week Three

  1. Hello There, i have a quick question =) im going to try my best to word it correctly lol
    in the video “Review of Dialogue 2,”
    It is signed “why are you excited” and the signer replies ” at 7 o clock i am going to Starbucks.” i understood this, however, you threw in the sign “what am i going to do/what am i doing” before you signed you are going to starbucks. Is it necessary to say “what am i doing, im going to do this” or can you just sign “i am going to do this”

    Thank you SO SO MUCH!!!
    just looking for some clarification =) xo

    Like

    • Great question! This is not required but is simply a common sentence structure called a rhetorical question. There are other grammatical ways to say the same thing. You could make this a time, topic-comment sentence and simply say TIME-7 STARBUCKS (topicalizes) ME GO. That is just one of the other ways. I’m sure after reviewing the common sentence structures you’ll be able to come up with more, too. Keep up the great work!

      Like

  2. When you are fingerspelling a word with two double letters, like “goodness”, do you just keep moving your hand out for the double letters? Like
    g
    o
    ..o
    ..d
    ..n
    ..e
    ..s
    ….s
    Or would you go back to the center line after the first double letter to prepare for the second double letter, like
    g
    o
    ..o
    ..d
    ..n
    ..e
    s
    ..s

    Thanks!

    Like

    • Hi Steph,

      Excellent question! For words with double letters, you will only move over for the second of the double letters and then will continue in that same position for the remaining letters (unless you have multiple sets of double letters like in the word “goodness”:

      Position 1 (where you start):
      g
      o

      Position 2 (move one “space” or about an inch to the outside (to the right if you are right-handed and to the left if you are left-handed):
      .o
      .d
      .n
      .e
      .s

      Position 3 (move one “space” or about an inch to the outside (to the right if you are right-handed and to the left if you are left-handed):
      ..s

      I hope that answers your question. Keep up the great work!

      Like

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