Week Seventeen

Text from the PowerPoint:

American Sign Language 2: Week Eight

 

Lesson 20 Vocabulary
• Add to, additional
• Admit, confess, willing, suggest
• Adult
• Audience
• Because
• Since
• Brave
• Bug, insect
• Change, alter, modify
• Close door
• Control, manage, direct, reign
• Count
• Deny
• Divide, split
• Equal, even, fair
• Exchange, switch, trade, substitute
• Follow
• Forbid, illegal, prohibited
• Honest, truth
• Honor
• #IF
• Keep, be careful
• Less, reduce
• Let, allow, permit
• Limit restrict
• Mean, cruel
• Measure

 

Chapter Twenty: Common Sentence Structures- Conditional Sentences: Suppose

  • The conditional clause
  • Always at the beginning of the sentence
  • Must clearly describe the condition
  • The outcome of the condition
  • Always in the second part of the sentence
  • Can be a question, statement, or command
  • Though there is flexibility in the ordering of conditional clauses in English, ASL always states the condition first followed by the outcome

 

Chapter Twenty: Common Sentence Structures- Conditional Sentences

  • Non-manual signals
  • Raise eyebrows
  • Tilt head
  • Hold the last sign of the first clause

 

Chapter Twenty: Common Sentence Structures- Conditional Sentences: Suppose: Examples

  • SUPPOSE HE SHOW-UP, WHAT-DO YOU?
  • If he shows up, what are you going to do about it?
  • SUPPOSE SHE SEE ME, ME MUST LEAVE.
  • I will have to leave if she sees me.
  • SUPPOSE TONIGHT SNOW, TOMORROW YOU CANCEL SCHOOL.
  • If it snows tonight then you will cancel school tomorrow.

 

Chapter Twenty: Common Sentence Structures- Conditional Sentences: If

  • #IF is also used to construct a conditional clause
  • Can be used interchangeably with SUPPOSE, but is often used to give greater emphasis to a condition
  • #IF or SUPPOSE can be omitted because the non-manuals are used and provide the same meaning

 

Chapter Twenty: Common Sentence Structures- Conditional Sentences: If: Examples

  • #IF SHE CAN’T COME, YOU LOSE TICKET.
  • If she can’t come, you lose the ticket.
  • Can be used as a warning
  • Emphasizes consequences
  • #IF YOU WIN GAME, YOUR TEAM CHAMPION.
  • If you win the game, your team will be the champions.
  • Emphasizes consequences

 

Chapter Twenty: Common Sentence Structures- Rhetorical Questions

  • When a signer asks a question and then answers it. A common grammatical structure. There is no expectation that someone else will answer the questions. They often make use of wh-questions such as WHY and HOW. A proper translation to English will seldom include a direct reference to these signs. WHY is often translated “because” and “yes” is usually omitted.

 

Chapter Twenty: Common Sentence Structures- Rhetorical Questions

  • Non-manual signals
  • Eye contact with the addressee
  • Raised eyebrows
  • Head tilted forward
  • Hold the last sign of the rhetorical question before answering it

 

Chapter Twenty: Common Sentence Structures- Rhetorical Questions: Examples

  • ME TAKE-UP ASL WHY? ME ENJOY.
  • I’m taking ASL because I enjoy it.
  • ARRIVE HERE HOW? TRAIN.
  • I rode the train here.
  • MY MOTHER, LIVES WHERE? THERE, ARIZONA.
  • My mother lives in Arizona.

 

Chapter Twenty Vocabulary

 

Common Sentence Structures: Conditional Sentences-#IF and Suppose

 

Common Sentence Structures: Rhetorical Questions

 

Common Sentence Structures: Rhetorical Questions Clarification

 

Clear The Stage by Jimmy Needham (audio)

 

Discussing Jimmy Needham’s Clear the Stage and Vocabulary

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